27
Oct

Augustine Marlorate (1506-1562) on the Death of Christ

   Posted by: CalvinandCalvinism   in For Whom did Christ Die?

Marlorate:

Christ came for the salvation of the whole world:

1) 44. And he sayde vnto them. These are the wordes which I spake vnto you whylest I was yet wyth you, that all muste needes bee fulfylled which were written of mee in the law of Moises, and in the prophets and in the Psalmes.

R. [Brentius] After that our Saviour Christ had proved by manifest and evident signs to his Disciples, that he was resen from death to life, he proceeds to set forth that which was th emost necessary of all others to enlarge the Borders of his Kingdom, and to set forth the glory of his majesty on Earth.

For Christ came not into this world to profit the nation of the Jews only, but that he might be salvation to the whole world. Christ rose again from death, not that this one Jew or that may have life, but that the happiness of everlasting life might be offered to all nations. A. [Marlorate] For so it was prophesied before I have given the all light to the Gentiles, that thou may be my salvation to the whole world.

R. [Brentius] And there is not a more convenient Instrument whereby these things may be revealed to the whole world, and to all nations then the preaching of the gospel [Esai. 49.6.]. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Marke and Lvke, trans Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London in the Fleetesteate neare, unto S. Dunstanes Church, by Thomas Marsh, 1583), Luke 24:44; p., 334.

Christ died for the salvation of all mankind:

1) Therefore works do not justify, that is to say, they do not make us the more acceptable unto God: the which works can be nothing else but sin, condemning, if so be they be wrought before thou be purified, and regenerated by the Spirit of God: because that an evil tree cannot bring forth good fruit. But the Lord describing his judgment, says (after the manner of men): that every man shall be judged, according to his works: even as we commonly are wont to judge.

Neither does he say, that every man shall receive according to his works, as though our works were the first cause of our salvation. For the special cause why we obtain everlasting life, is the voluntary & free will of God: and the second cause are the merits of Christ, for he died for salvation of all mankind: but this also is a free gift of good will of God. The third cause, our faith, by the which we embrace and receive this good will of God, and the merits of Christ. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approued Deuines (which the Lorde hath geuen to his Churche) by Augustine Marlorate. And translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Thomas Tymme, Minister, Sene and allowed according to the order appointed (Imprinted at London in Fletestreate near vnto S. Dunstones churche, by Thomas Marshe, 1570), Matt. 16:27; pp., 373-374. [Some spelling modernized.].

2) {Thou wente one of the twelue}

C. [Calvin] What fruit reprehensions bring forth, we here see The disciples are still & silent, nor for shame, but for true obedience sake. For they stand so much to the judgement of Christ, that after they knkow that the thing which displeased them, pleased him, they are quiet. Even so ought we do when we have recieved a fall, being taught not to be ashamed to rise from our error. On the contrary part we see what good reprehension does in the minds of obstinate: for the admonition of Christ did profit so little to turn the heart of Judas, or to make it better, that he went by & by void of care, to make a most wicked bargain with the enemies of Christ. But it was a wonderful & monstrous insensible dulness, that in the loss of the ointment that he thought he had gotten an honest excuse to so wicked a fact: & futher that he being admonished by the words of Christ, knew not what to do. The only mention of his burial had been enough to mollify and iron heart: when he might have gathered thereby that Christ offered himself a sacrifice for the salvation of mankind. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approued Deuines (which the Lorde hath geuen to his Churche) by Augustine Marlorate. And translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Thomas Tymme, Minister, Sene and allowed according to the order appointed (Imprinted at London in Fletestreate near vnto S. Dunstones churche, by Thomas Marshe, 1570), Matt. 27:14, p., 625. [Some spelling modernized.]

3) M. [Musculus] And to know God the Father and Jesus Christ whom he has sent, is not simply to know that God is God, and that Jesus Christ is both the Son of God, and the Son of Man: but is to know the mystery of the Cross, & of the received dispensation, & to redeem mankind from sin, and death, originally coming from Adam: as, that God is the Father of his only begotten Son Christ, and that he sent him for man’s salvation into the world, by whose blood salvation belongs to all men, as well to the Jews as the Gentiles which believe in him without whom there is no salvation… if any man reply and say, that the name of GOD belongs as well unto Christ as to the Father, then the same question shall be moved concerning the Holy Ghost.

For if so be the Father only and the Son be one GOD, then the Holy Ghost is put out of his degree: which is no less absurd.

The answer hereunto is easily made. If a man mark and consider well the manner of speech, which Christ uses in divers places of the Gospel of Saint John: of which the Reader’s have been often admonished already that they cannot forget it. Christ appearing in the form of a man, places the power, essence, and majesty of GOD under the person of his Father.

Therefore there is but one true God the Father of Christ. That is to say, that GOD which promised unto the world long ago, a redeemer, is one.  Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini, 1575), John 17:3; p., 542. [Pagination irregular; stated pagination cited here.]

Christ came to save all men:

1) {And Iesus rebuked.} M. [Musculus] That is to say he commanded him: according to the which we read in the 8th chapter going before. Whereupon the Evangelist Mark more at large expounding this, says that Christ after this manner spake unto the spirit, “Thou dumb and death spirit. I charge thee, come out of him, and enter no more into him.” This reprehension declares a certain indignation and anger of Christ against the unclean spirit: & that justly. For how should not he which came to save all men, be angry with the spirit of perdition, & the enemy of mankind? For the more the love of Christ was toward mankind, the greater was his hate against those spirits which were the enemies of the health of mankind. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approued Deuines (which the Lorde hath geuen to his Churche) by Augustine Marlorate. And translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Thomas Tymme, Minister, Sene and allowed according to the order appointed (Imprinted at London in Fletestreate near vnto S. Dunstones churche, by Thomas Marshe, 1570), Matt. 13:15; pp., 386-387. [Some spelling modernized.].

Christ came for the advantage of all men:

1) {And to give his life also a redemption for manye.}

…Bu [Bullinger] I am truly the only son of the living God, by whom all things were made, your Lord and master, the Prince of life, and the conqueror of death, and the power of Satan’s kingdom: yet notwithstanding I arrogate and take unto me no dignity. For I came for the commodity of all men, and that I might give my live for sinners. Let therefore all poor counsels and studies tend to this end that you see the health and profit of all men, and that you abase yourselves to the lower degree. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approued Deuines (which the Lorde hath geuen to his Churche) by Augustine Marlorate. And translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Thomas Tymme, Minister, Sene and allowed according to the order appointed (Imprinted at London in Fletestreate near vnto S. Dunstones churche, by Thomas Marshe, 1570), Matt. 20:28; p., 452. [Some spelling modernized.]

Unlimited Expiation:

Christ satisfied for us all:

1) {But forasmuche as he was not able.}

Bu [Bullinger] Therefore is no man able to satisfy for his sin. For most false and blasphemous is the doctrine of the Monks, which say that satisfaction may be made for our sins. The Prophet truly, and christianly say, that all our sins are heaped upon Christ, and he has satisfied for us all. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approued Deuines (which the Lorde hath geuen to his Churche) by Augustine Marlorate. And translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Thomas Tymme, Minister, Sene and allowed according to the order appointed (Imprinted at London in Fletestreate near vnto S. Dunstones churche, by Thomas Marshe, 1570), Matt. 20:28; p., 412. [Some spelling modernized.] [Note: It is very probable that here Marlorate is referring to Isa 53:5-6 where Reformers like Calvin understood the reference “we have all gone astray” to refers to all mankind, and so the sin of all mankind was laid upon Christ. C.f Calvin on Isaiah 53:5 and 6.

Sins of the world:

1) And it was lawful for none to eat of the sweet bread, but, that the day of preparation, in which the Lord did eat the Passover, and also suffered was no feast day, it may be proved by many places of Scripture and namely by this: Not on the feast day lest there arise a tumult among the people [Verse. 5. Mark, 14.]. Therefore they took him not and show him on the feast day. And although they took him not in the solemnity, seeing that the solemnity was commonly said to be of the day, yet notwithstanding they took him in the feast day: namely the night going before the solemnity, the which one day, is solemn and holy. The which thing was not done without good consideration, for the typical passover only was appointed to be offered on the feast day: wherefore much more that also which was the only true passover, which is Christ, that is offered for the salvation of all men

Therefore these words, Pesah, Pascha, Phase, Easter, & Passover, are all one in signification. Furthermore this day of Passover was a festival day, which was celebrate among the Hebrews with great zeal, putting themselves, from year to year in memory of that day in the which, there door posts being stricken with the blood of the Lamb, when they dwelt among the Egyptians, were delivered from the destroying Angel. For thus we read: “And they shall take the blood and strike it on the two-side posts, and on the upper door post, even in the house where they shall eat him.” And a little after it is added: “For I will pass through the land of Egypt, this same night, and will smite all the first-born in the land of Egypt, both man and beast, upon all the goods of Egypt will I the Lord do execution. And the blood shall be unto you a token, in the houses wherein ye are. And when I see the blood, I will pass over you and the plague shall not be upon you to destroy you, when I smite the land of Egypt. And this day shall unto you a remembrance, and ye shall keep it holy day unto the Lord, forever,” [Exod. 12.]. M. Christ says not here simply, after two days the Son of Man shall be delivered up, &c. But he says, “After two days shall Easter, & the Son of man, &c. To the end he might declare that the time was Easter was the appointed time in the which he should be crucified. Furthermore that he might declare that he was the true Passover which must be offered for the redemption of the world, the type & figure whereof was that Passover which the Jews celebrated everywhere. The Evangelist Mark, instead of, “Ye know that after two days shall Easter,” writes, “After two days was Easter and the days of the sweet bread,” that is (according to the words of S. Luke.) [Luke. 22.]. The feast of sweet bread drew nigh which is called Easter, that is to say the eating of the Paschal lamb, and the unleavened bread. For in the aforesaid chapter of Exodus, where it was commanded as concerning the celebration of passover, it is straight away added, “Seven days shall ye eat unleavened bread.”

{And the Son of Man}

C. [Calvin] Now Christ confirms that again, which we have heard him so often fore-shown unto his Disciples: but this last forewarning does more plainly show how willing he was to offer himself to the death: and it was necessary, because God could not be pleased but by the Sacrifice of obedience. He meant also to prevent the office, least the Disciples, thinking that he was constrained by necessity to be delivered to death should quail and faint in the faith. And so the use of this sentence was two manner of ways. First that it might be declared that the Son of God of his own accord delivered himself to death, that he might reconcile the world to his Father: because otherwise he could not satisfy for the guilt of sin, or purchase us righteousness. Secondly, that he was not oppressed to die, as by a violent death which he could not avoid, but because he did he did willingly offer himself to the death.

He does therefore here openly declare that he comes to Jerusalem with good advisement, that he might suffer death. For he having liberty to go back again, and in quiet return to over-pass that time, yet notwithstanding even in the very moment and time convenient, he goes with good advisement and deliberation into the midst of his enemies. And although it did then nothing profit the Disciples to be admonish to the obedience which he showed towards his Father, yet notwithstanding afterward their faith was not a little built by this doctrine. Even as also at this day we receive no small profit thereby: because as it were in a lively glass the willing sacrifice is set forth unto us, by the which all the transgressions of the world are wiped away: and we do behold and see the Son of God in going boldly and without fear to his death to be now the conqueror of death. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approued Deuines (which the Lorde hath geuen to his Churche) by Augustine Marlorate. And translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Thomas Tymme, Minister, Sene and allowed according to the order appointed (Imprinted at London in Fletestreate near vnto S. Dunstones churche, by Thomas Marshe, 1570), , Matt 26:1-2. pp., 614, 616-617. [Some spelling modernized.]

2) Now let us note to what end the words of Christ do tend, namely that the Disciples knowing whatsoever is done to be governed by the providence of God, should not think that his life or death, was ordered by chance. But the profit that comes of this doctrine, does farther extend itself: because then at the last, the fruit of Christ’s death shall be truly ratified unto us, when it is manfestly known, that he was not rashly carried of men to the cross, but by the eternal decree of God was ordained a sacrifice to take away the sins of the world: For how comes reconciliation u nto us and the atonement, but only because Christ by his obedience has pleased the Father? Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approued Deuines (which the Lorde hath geuen to his Churche) by Augustine Marlorate. And translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Thomas Tymme, Minister, Sene and allowed according to the order appointed (Imprinted at London in Fletestreate near vnto S. Dunstones churche, by Thomas Marshe, 1570), Matt. 26:24, p., 631. [Some spelling modernized.]

3) {Then came Jesus with them}

C. [Calvin] This is indeed the exordium and beginning of the sacrifice by the which we are reconciled unto God. For Christ began here to offer himself it was meet that this should be a voluntary sacrifice. If he had been drawn against his will, it had been no true sacrifice or oblation. He humbled himself, being made obedient to death, even to the death of the Cross. “No man takes away my life from me” (says he) “but I give the same of myself.” Christ therefore rightly take upon him the parts of a mediator, that by his sacrifice, he might take away the sins of the world, because he offered himself to the death wilingly. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approued Deuines (which the Lorde hath geuen to his Churche) by Augustine Marlorate. And translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Thomas Tymme, Minister, Sene and allowed according to the order appointed (Imprinted at London in Fletestreate near vnto S. Dunstones churche, by Thomas Marshe, 1570), Matt 26:36, p.,649. [Some spelling modernized.]

4) {Therefore whom they were gathered together,}

C. [Calvin] Here does he extreme cruelty of the Priests,and also the furious obstinancy of the people is described unto us…

But truly neither the Priests nor the multitude are terrified with shame, but do require that a seditious person & a murderer may be committed to them. Ye by the way we must note the purpose of God, by the which it came to pass, that Christ, as the worst of all men was given to the Cross. The Jews truly rage against him with blind furor and madness: but because God had appointed him to be a sacrifice for the sins of the whole world, he suffered him to be counted inferior to a theif and a murderer. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approued Deuines (which the Lorde hath geuen to his Churche) by Augustine Marlorate. And translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Thomas Tymme, Minister, Sene and allowed according to the order appointed (Imprinted at London in Fletestreate near vnto S. Dunstones churche, by Thomas Marshe, 1570), Matt 27:18. p., 701. [Some spelling modernized.]

5) C. [Calvin] In that Christ suffers him not to return to Bethsaida (where the miracle might have had many witnesses) some think that it was done, because Christ in depriving the inhabitants of that place of his grace, meant to plague them. Whatsoever the cause was, this is certain that he did not the miracle to the end it should be buried in silence forever, but he would have it to lie hid with other miracles also, until the Sins of the world being put away by his death he was ascended into the glory of his Father. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Marke and Lvke, trans Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London in the Fleetesteate neare, unto S. Dunstanes Church, by Thomas Marsh, 1583), Mark 8:26; p., 50.

6) And when they came nigh to Jerusalem unto Bethphage, & bethany, at the mount of Olives, he sends forth two of his Disciples.

Our Saviour Christ at the last comes to Jerusalem in the which he should be offered a sacrifice for the sins of the whole world, and should redeem the believing from sin and death. But before he played the priest in the offering himself, he would show himself to be a king also, and a deliverer of his faithful people, for therefore he enters with kingly pomp into Jerusalem.  Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Marke and Lvke, trans Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London in the Fleetesteate neare, unto S. Dunstanes Church, by Thomas Marsh, 1583), Mark 11:1; p., 63.

7) C. [Calvin] There is no doubt but that the Lord speak here, concerning the office of the Messiah, as the same was described by the Prophets, lest the death of the Cross might be an offense unto them. And in the way as they went the space of three or four hours was enough to declare the matter at large. Wherefore he did not briefly show that Christ ought to suffer, but plentifully declared that he was therefore sent, that by the sacrifice of his Death he might make satisfaction for the sins of the World, that he might be the peace offering to take away the curse.

Therefore Luke has put down this sentence interrogatively for the greater vehemency. Whereby we gather that the necessity of his death was shown by reasons. The sum is, that the disciples were troubled amiss with the death of Christ, without the which he could not do the office of Christ, and open the gates of the kingdom of heaven, because the principal part of the redemption was the sacrifice of his body. The which ought diligently to be noted. For seeing Christ wanted his honor, except he be taken fro the offering and Sacrifice for sins, the abasing of himself is the only entrance into his Glory, by which he became a redeemer. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Marke and Lvke, trans Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London in the Fleetesteate neare, unto S. Dunstanes Church, by Thomas Marsh, 1583), Luke 22:22, p., 323-324.

8) A. For he says, “I will be with you unto the end of the world”

C [Calvin]. He calls the same another comforter, by reason of the difference of benefits we have from them both, it was proper unto Christ to make satisfaction for the sins of the world, to pacify the wrath of God, to redeem men from death, to bring them righteousness and life: but it belongs unto the Spirit to make us partakers as well of Christ himself, as of all his own benefits. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini, 1575), John 14:16, p., 489.

9) {But that the world might know}

That is to say. Therefore I will give place to the power of Satan, and deliver myself into the hands of sinners, that the world may know that I love the Father. C. We have in this to note that God’s decree here stands in the highest place, lest we should think that Christ was so carried to death by the violence of Satan, that something happened to him beside the purpose of God.

For it is God which has obtained his Son to be the propitiatory, and which would take away the sins of the world by his death. The which to bring to pass he suffered Satan for a short time to triumph over them as conqueror. Therefore Christ did not resist Satan, that he might obey his Father’s will and decree, and might so offer his obedience as a price and ransom for our righteousness.

M. [Musculus] To this effect pertains that which Paul rightly saying, “That Christ was obedient to his Father to the death even to the death of the Cross.” A [Marlorate] Also Christ a little before testified, that he received this commandment from the Father, that he shoudl give his life for his sheep. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini, 1575), John 14:31, p., 498.

10) “I haue glorifyed thee on earth: I haue fynished the worke whiche thou gauest me to do.”

M. [Musculus] Now he speaks of that by which he advance the glory of his Father’s name, both by doctrine and by signs, all the race of his dispensation, ascribing unto him continually all things both himself, and his doctrine, and also the powers of miracles.

C. [Calvin] Yea, in these words he comprehends all the parts of his Ministry, meaning that he has finished all the whole course of his calling: for then was due and full time when he should be received up into heavenly glory. For although the special part was yet behind, namely the sacrifice of his death, by which he made satisfaction for the sins of all men: yet notwithstanding, because the hour of death was now at hand, he speaks even as if he had already suffered the same. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini, 1575),John 17:4; p., 543. [Pagination irregular; stated pagination cited here.]

11) “I praye for them, I praye not for the world: but for them which thou haste giuen mee, for they are thine.”

…C. [Calvin] So that he plainly affirms that he prays not for the world: because he cared for his own flock only, which he had received of his Father’s hand, notwithstanding this might seem very absurd.

For there cannot be a better Rule of prayer devised, then if we follow Christ our Captain and master. But we are commanded to pray for all men, yea even for our enemies [Math. 5.4., 1. Tim. 2.1., Luk. 13.34.]. C. [Calvin] Furthermore Christ himself prayed after this Indifferently for all men saying, “Father forgive them: for they [know not] wotte not what they do.”

M. [Musculus] Moreover it is the office of a Mediator not only to pray but also to offer. And he offered himself upon the Cross for all men. For (as says Paul) “Lasix online pharmacy in Cleveland.” Finally Saint John says that he is the “Where to purchase zovirax in Baltimore. How then says he that he prays not for the world seeing he died for all men, and was the propitiation for the sins of the whole world? C. [Calvin] this may be briefly answered, that these prayers which seem to be made for all men are notwithstanding restrained to the elect of God.

We ought to wish this and that man be saved and so to comprehend all mankind because yet we cannot distinguish the elect from the Reprobate yet notwithstanding we pray withal for the coming of God’s kingdom, wishing that he would destroy his enemies.

This is even as much as to pray for the salvation of all men whom we know to be created after the Image of GOD, and which are of the same nature we are of, and do leave their destruction to Judgment of GOD whom he knows to be reprobate. There was another certain special cause of this prayer, which ought not to be drawn into example. For Christ’s prayer proceeded not only from the bare sense of faith and love, but also from the feeling of his Father’s secret Judgments which are hidden from us, so long as we walk through faith.

M. [Musculus] Therefore because we know not who they are which so appertain unto the world that they can never be drawn away from the same, it is meet that we wish well unto all men, and to declare our good-will by prayer. C. [Calvin] Furthermore by these words we gather, that they whom it pleases, God to love out of this world shall be heirs of eternal life: and that this difference depended no upon man’s merits but upon the mere good-will and grace of God.

For the which place the cause of election in men must first begin with faith.

Christ plainly pronounces that they were the Father’s which were given unto him.   Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini, 1575), John 17:9; pp., 560-561. [Pagination irregular; stated pagination cited here.]

12) 1:18. And which am aliue, And i was dead, and behold I am aliue for euermore. Amen. And I have the keyes of Hell and of death.

Christ unvanguished
of death.

“And which am aliue.” A. [Marlorate] This places shows that although Christ were yet dead, yet he was not quite dispatched by death as the Jews hoped. In respect whereof he said, “when ye shall have lifted up the Son of Man, then shall ye know that I am,” John 8.28. And again: “when I am lifted up from the earth, I will draw all things unto me,” John 12.32. And he is said to live now: not only because he has life in him, but also because he gives life to all things. In consideration whereof he is said not only to be “alive,” but also to be the life itself. John 1.4. and  14.6.

“And I was dead.”

Christ’s dying
for us.

A [Marlorate] This cannot be verified of the Angels, because they are invisible and immortal spirits. S. [Seb. Meyer] But Christ, to obey his Father, and to wash away the sins of mankind, was contented to yield himself to death for a time, A. [Marlorate] to the intent he might at length by death destroy him that had the power of death (that is to say the Devil), and set them at liberty, which for fear of death were subject to bondage all their life long, Hebr. 2.14,15. For even from the beginning GOD purposed upon this sacrifice, wherein Christ the true shepherd of all men gave his life for his sheep, John 10.15,17. G. [Caspar Megander] And like as Christ the head of the Church entered into his glory by death, Luke 24.26, so becomes it all the godly to dye with him, that they may be glorified together with him, according as Paul teaches in Rom. 8.17 and 2 Timo. 2.11,12, and Acts 14.22.   Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike exposition vpon the Reuelation of Sainct Iohn, (Printed by H. Binneman, for L. Harison, and G. Bishop, 1574),) Rev. 1:18, p., 27b. [Some spelling modernized and formatting modified.]

Unlimited Redemption:

Christ sent to redeem mankind:

1) M. [Musculus] The words and those whch follow, contain an exposition of the dispensation which he had taken upon him, whereby he being the only begotten Son of his Father, descended from heaven into this world, to redeem mankind. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini. 1575), John 1:14, p., 75. [Some spelling modernized.]

2) M. [Musculus] And to know God the Father, and Jesus Christ whom he has sent, is not simply to know that God is God, and that Jesus Christ is both the Son of God, and the Son of Man: but is to know the mystery of the Cross, & of the received dispensation, & to redeem mankind from sins, and from death, originally from Adam: as, that God is the Father of only only begotten Son Christ, and that he sent him for man’s salvation into the world, by whose blood salvation belongs to all men, as well to the Jews as the Gentiles, which believe in him without whom there is no salvation. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini, 1575), John 17:3, 542.

3) {This commaundement have I receyued}

M. [Musculus] He  now opens the well-spring of his power: namely, his Father’s commandment. And by this commandment he understands the will of God, and that eternal counsel, by which he had determined to send his Son into this world, and to give him to death, for the redemption of mankind.  Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini. 1575), John 10:18, p., 376. [Some spelling modernized.]

Christ died for the salvation and redemption of mankind:

1) Bu [Bullinger] Now in plain words he shows that he would die for the salvation and redemption of mankind. For he showing athat death and bonds waited for him says: “Now shall my first ministry increas, by which I abase myself even to the form of a servant. For the hour of my passion is at hand. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini. 1575), John 14:38, p., 497. [Pagination irregular, stated page 498; Some spelling modernized.]

Chrst the redeemer of all:

1) {My Lord and my God.}

For an abrupt speech has always great vehemency. And there is no doubt but that shame constrained him thus to cry, whereby he might condemn his former sloth. BU [Bullinger] But this, as it is a most brief confession of a true faith, so also it is a must absolute. For Thomas gathered by the true resurrection of the body that he was Jesus and the Lord, that is to say, the Redeemer, and the King of all: Also God, that is to say, the life and conservation of all creatures: and not only the God and Lord of all things, but also his God, and this Lord. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini, 1575), John 20:28; p., 601.

2) C. [Calvin] The Visitation of the which Zacharias speaks, is put here, as the cause and beginning of the redemptoin As if he should say, “God has visited,” & looked upon his People to redeem. A [Marlorate] And this Redemption shows that there was frist a captivity. For the People was so captured that they could not hope for deliverance from any other then from God alone. But in what Captivity were they: Surely, at that time they were oppressed with cruel Tyranny: but yet the Captivity was more hard & grevious, from which they were to be delivered. For the Lord by and by after the beginning promised a Redeemer of all men which were, & which should be to the World’s end.

Neither was the people always Captive. Whereupon it follows that the redemption was not carnal. For there were certain Ages in the which the people flourished. Even so, Christ is the Redeemer of men’s Souls, and not of their bodies only. And there is no doubt, but that so was the meaning of Zecharias. As if he should say, “He taking our flesh upon him, visited those that were in bondage, and in the shadow of Death, and visiting them, and giving himself for those that were in Bondage, he redeemed them, with peril of his own Life, submiting himself unto that punishment which was due unto those that were in Bondage.”

C. [Calvin] And hereby we gather, that the holy Fathers themselves were not free from the Yoke of sin, and from the Tyranny of Death, but by the grace of Christ, for Christ is said to be sent a redeemer to the holy and elect people of God. But if so be  Redemption were then brought by Christ and not before he came in the flesh, it follows that the Faithful which were dead before his comming, were all their Life time the Servants of Sin and death, which were very absurd.

We answer, that the force and Effect of this Redemption, which was once offered in Christ, was common to all Ages. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Marke and Lvke, trans Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London in the Fleetesteate neare, unto S. Dunstanes Church, by Thomas Marsh, 1583), Luke 1:68; p., 64.

Christ the redeemer of the world:

1) M. [Musculus] we must note that to believe Christ, is to believe the Father, is to believe that he sent his Son into the world to be the redeemer of the same. Therefore, we must believe God, not simply as God, (of which faith the Jews brag) but as the Father in the Son, and as the sender in him that sent. He which wants this faith, may be reckoned among the binded Jews, &c., not among Christians. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini. 1575), John 5:24, p., 165. [Some spelling modernized.]

2) But that at which Matthew says, is more large, namely that Christ forbad them to publish the same of those signs and miracles that he did: not that he would have them wholly suppressed, but that they having now taken roote, should brig forth their fruit in the due and convenient time, which time as yet was not come. For we know that Christ did not dally, or trifle in his in his miracles, that he, he wrought them not without some serious effect to come, but he had his regard, to prove himself thereby to be the Son of God, and the redeemer of the world. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approued Deuines (which the Lorde hath geuen to his Churche) by Augustine Marlorate. And translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Thomas Tymme, Minister, Sene and allowed according to the order appointed (Imprinted at London in Fletestreate near vnto S. Dunstones churche, by Thomas Marshe, 1570), 254. [Some spelling modernized.]

3) (And when the Sabboth day was come)

BU. The Lord which came to redeem and lighten the World does no again fall to teaching. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Marke and Lvke, trans Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London in the Fleetesteate neare, unto S. Dunstanes Church, by Thomas Marsh, 1583), Mark 6:1; p., 39.

4) 5. Iesus Loued Martha and her Sister, and Lazarus.

M. [Musculus] This the Evangelist adds because of the words of Mary and Martha which the told by the message unto the Lord, saying, “Lord, behold he whom thou loves is sick.” Jesus loved not only Lazarus but also his sisters. By that is to say all this household and family which were Godly disposed. M. [Musculus] For Christ loved all men in that he came into the world to be the savior and redeemer of all men, and not only those which were then living, but those also which should be upon the earth unto the world’s end. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini. 1575), John 11:5, p., 398. [Some spelling modernized.]

5) If any man object and say, that this place is contrary to thatw here he pronounces those eyes to be blessed which behold him present [Mat. 13.16.]. We answer, “That Christ does not speak there of a corporeal aspect only, as he does in this place, but of the revelation which is common to all the godly, from the time that he came to be redeemer of the world.” Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini, 1575), John 20:29; p., 602.

Man’s redemption:

1) [Thinkest thou that I cannot now praie}

G. [Gregory] Now followed that special reason, of the which we made mention a little before. For Christ4 admonishes that we could have a far better kind of defence, and a more lawful, at hand, if it were not that he must obey his Father’s will for this is the sum, seeing he was appointed by the eternal purpose of God to be a Sacrifice, and becuase the same was declared also to be testimony of Scripture, it was not meet to impugn or resist the same: And thus the rashness of Peter is condemned by another circumstance, because he went not only about to frustrate the Heavenly decree, but also to stop the way of man’s Redemption. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini. 1575), Matt 26:53. p.,666. [Some spelling modernized.]

The redemption of the world:

1) Furthermore, there is no bond more holy then the spirtual bond: because he ought not to be comprehended according to the flesh, but by the power of the Spirit, with the which he was endued of the Father to regenerate men: that they which were by nature unclean and cursed seed of Adam, might by grace be made the holy and celestial sons of God. Therefore S. Paul says, “that a man knows not Christ truly, according to the flesh,” [2. Cor. 5.]: because we must consider the redemption of the world, which far surmounts the capacity of men, or himan power, when he reformed us by his Spirit, according to the image of God. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approued Deuines (which the Lorde hath geuen to his Churche) by Augustine Marlorate. And translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Thomas Tymme, Minister, Sene and allowed according to the order appointed (Imprinted at London in Fletestreate near vnto S. Dunstones churche, by Thomas Marshe, 1570), 275-276. [Some spelling modernized.]

2) Bu. [Bullinger] Therefore he says here, “I will give”: & not “I have given.” He promised that he will give the keys, he gives them not. But after the resurrection he said unto them, “Peace be unto you. As my Father sent me, even so send I you also.” And when he had said these words, he breathed on them, and said unto them, “receive ye the the Holy Ghost. Who soever sins he remit, they are remitted unto them. And whosoever sins ye retain, they are retained.” In the which words,”As my Father sent me,” &c. there is a comparison, not an equality. For Christ was sent, that he might be the redemption of the whole world: the Apostles were not so sent, but only to preach. But as Christ was sent, of the Father, for the salvation of the whole world: so the Apostles were sent to preach this salvation, that they which believe their believe their preaching, might be saved, as if he had heard Christ himself: as he says in another place, “He which hears you hears me.” Moreover he says not, “They shall be given, but I will give”: by the which words Christ challenges all this power of the kingdom of heaven to himself, as Lord in so much that he might commit the same to whom it pleased him. For here it makes no great matter, not only who receives, but of whom any thing is received. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approued Deuines (which the Lorde hath geuen to his Churche) by Augustine Marlorate. And translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Thomas Tymme, Minister, Sene and allowed according to the order appointed (Imprinted at London in Fletestreate near vnto S. Dunstones churche, by Thomas Marshe, 1570), Matt. 13:15; p., 362. [Some spelling modernized.].

3) And a little after it is added: ‘For I will pass through the land of Egypt, this same night, and will smite all the firstborn in the land of Egypt, both man and beast, and upon all the goods of Egypt will I the Lord do execution. And the blood shall be unto you are token, in the houses wherein ye are. And I shall see the blood, I will pass over you and the plague shall not be upon you to destroy you when I shall smite the land of Egypt. And this day shall be unto you a remembrance, and ye shall keep it holy unto the Lord, forever,” [Exod. 14.]. M {Musculus]. Christ says not here simply, after two days the son of man shall be delivered up, &c. But he says, “After two days shall be Easter, & the son of man,” &c. To the end he might declare that the time of Easter was appointed time in which he should be crucified. Furthermore that he might declare that he was the true Passover which must be offered for the redemption of the world, the type and figure whereof was the Passover which the Jews celebrated every year. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approued Deuines (which the Lorde hath geuen to his Churche) by Augustine Marlorate. And translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Thomas Tymme, Minister, Sene and allowed according to the order appointed (Imprinted at London in Fletestreate near vnto S. Dunstones churche, by Thomas Marshe, 1570), Matt. 26:1-2, p., 616. [Some spelling modernized.]

4) Therefore we may reject this as an evil argument, that they are not loved of God, whom he seems to hate for a time: yea, there is nothing more absurd, than to restrain and tie his love to every particular time. God truly, has promised that he will be our deliverer: but if at any time he wink at our trouble, we must patiently abide his leisure. Wherefore the chief priests do gather amiss, that Christ is not the Son of God, because he is not delivered from the cross: for hereby he redeemed mankind from death and hell. But Christ against these temptations of the wicked comforted himself thus: “Thou art he that took me out of my mother’s womb, thou was my hope when I hung yet on my mother’s breasts. I have been left unto thee ever since. I was born: thou art my God, even from my mother’s womb. O go not from me,” &c. [Psalm. 22.] Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approued Deuines (which the Lorde hath geuen to his Churche) by Augustine Marlorate. And translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Thomas Tymme, Minister, Sene and allowed according to the order appointed (Imprinted at London in Fletestreate near vnto S. Dunstones churche, by Thomas Marshe, 1570), Matt. 27:43, p., 723. [Some spelling modernized.]

5) Now, how can Christ suffer with us, and be touched with our infirmities, except he were subject to those affections, and infirmities before? Therefore, he is one whole described to be Hungry, another while Thirsty, another while Weary, another while Scourged, another while Crucified, another while Dying: to the end we may know, that we have an high Priest, that has felt in himself our infirmities, and so may have a sure hope and trust in all adversities. For Christ knows how we are minded, and affected in them, and of what help we stand in need, seeing that he himself has born the like. This matter is very well handled by the Apostle in his Epistle to the Hebrews. M [Musculus] This so belongs to the confirmation of our faith, by which we believe that Christ was not only GOD, but also perfect man, in all things like unto us, sin excepted. For in that he was weary of his journey, he does not declare his Divinity, but rather his humanity, and the Imbecility of the flesh, according to the which, he suffered Hunger, Thirst, Weariness, sorrows, and death itself. It was necessary that by these and such like arguments the true Assumption of our flesh, in which the redemption and reconciliation of mankind was made perfect, should be declared. Moreover these things prescribe and set before us an example to follow. The Lord was weary o fhis Journey. Wherefore? because he used not to ride, but always went on foot, what Journey soever be he took in hand. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini. 1575), John 4:6, p., 105. [Some spelling modernized.]

6) Bu. [Bullinger] When Jesus knew what privily went about, he declared unto them in certain dark sentences, both that there conspiracies should be vain, and also that he would in a sort time of his own free will offer up his body to the death of the cross for the redemption of the whole world: and so under a certain hidden and dark speech, he declares unto them the mystery of the dispensation, that he should shortly die, after that ascend into heaven, and so com from then to judge his enemies. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini. 1575), John 7:33, p., 265.

7) Therefore thou shalt then find life in Christ, if so he thou seek the matter and substance of life in his flesh. For so soon as we forsake the Sacrifice of his death, there is nothing before our eyes but death, neither does he bring us any other way to feeling his divine power, than by his death and resurrection. M [Musculus] Therefore he speaks of the redemption of mankind, which should be by his death, for the which cause he intended to offer his flesh and blood a sacrifice to his Father for the remission of the sins of the whole world. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini. 1575), John 6:54, p., 277. [Some spelling modernized.]

8) Bu. [Bullinger] Hereby certainly, it is evident that the Son died with the good will of the Father, and that the will and purpose of them both was all one in the redeeming of the world. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini. 1575), John 10:17, p., 374. [Some spelling modernized.]

9) {That Jesus should dye for the people.}

This prophesy of Ciaphas is he sum of all prophecy, namely, that salvation comes to the elect by the death of Christ.

M. [Musculus] The Jews did put Christ to death to get honor to themselves: but Christ died that by his death he might redeem the world. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini, 1575), John 11:51. [418: original pagination incorrect, actual page 425.]

10) Bu. [Bullinger] By the world he means carnal men, and such as are not regenerated, which are unbelieving, and live in the world, after the manner of the world. Also this word (shall see) is by a metaphor transferred from the body to the mind. Therefore carnal men and unbelievers do not see, do not understand, nor believe Jesus to be the Son of God, and yet nevertheless very man, who by his death brings to life, and redeems all mankind from damnation.   Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini. 1575), John 14:19, p., 491. [Some spelling modernized.]

Apostates redeemed, Marlorate on Jude 4:

1) Which turn the grace of our God unto wantonness] Now he declares manifestly, what manner of mischief that is, that they should beware & take heed of: namely this: that these false Apostle & deceivers, abused the grace of God unto all wantonness & licentiousness, thinking, that because their sins were forgiven, they might do what they list [wished]. They sinned therefore without all shame, and willingly fell back again into the slavery and bondage of sin, from whence Christ had redeemed them by the shedding of his blood. C [Calvin.] The grace of God verily appeared to a far other end, then to get[?] men to leave to sin, as Paul plainly witnesses, saying: “The grace of God hath appeared healthful to all men, teaching us, that denying ungodliness, and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, and righteously, and godly in this present evil wild,” [P. to Tit. 2. vers. 11]. Let us know therefore, that there is nothing more hurtful & pernicious than these kind of men, which of the grace of Christ, do take an occasion to live wantonly and licentiously. And because we teach, that we are saved by the free mercy of God, the Papists lay this to our charge as a great fault. But what does it prevail with words to confute their shamelessness, sith [since] everywhere & in all places we call earnestly upon repentance, the fear of God, & newness of life. They themselves do not only corrupt & mar the whole world by their evil examples & wicked life, but also take quite out of the world by their pestilent and wicked doctrine, true holiness and the pure worshiping of God. M [Mar. Lut.] Indeed they call themselves Christians, and brag much of the gospel, but they live such a kind of life, as they do whatever pleases them, sinning most wickedly and abominably in drunkenness, in lechery, and all abomination. Their Bishops and Prelates do vaunt and say, we have taken upon us, not a worldly, but a spiritual state and condition of life: under which name & false pretense, they have gotten great treasures, pleasures, and dignities: [Calvin] although we may rather think them to be like the Libertines of our time, of whom Jude speaks, as it shall more clearly appear in the discourse hereof. It follows.

And God which is the only Lord.] Certain old translation have, “Christ which is the only God & Lord.” In the epistle of S. Peter mention is made only of Christ, and there he is called Lord. For thus he writes, “even denying the Lord which has bough them,” [2. Peter. Vers. 1.]. A [Aug. Mar.] If any man think it better to read it differently or by itself, then the sense will be, “Chiefly they deny God,” L. [Pelicane.] whom once they have professed, which is the only Lord of al things, both in heaven and earth. It follows.

And deny our Lord Jesus Christ.] C. [Calvin.] He understands Christ to be denied, when such as have been redeemed by his blood, have given themselves again to be bondslaves to Satan, making as much as in them lies, the incomparable and inestimable benefit & price of our redemption, to be frustrate & of none effect. Therefore let us remember that Christ died and rose again for us, to the end that he might make us a peculiar people to himself, & that he might be Lord of our life, and death. A. [Aug. Mar.] Again, Christ is denied, when we derogate from him, that which is his own: After which manner the Monks, and such like deny Christ. M [Mar. Lut.] For when they preach that the way to eternal happiness & felicity, is to fast, to gad & wander on pilgrimage, to build Churches, and Monasteries: to vow chastity, obedience, poverty, and such like: they plainly deceive the simple and ignorant by their works, but of Christ they make no mention at all: which is as much, as if they should say, it is very needful and necessary for thee to deserve heaven by thy own works, Christ profited thee nothing, his works cannot help thee: and so they deny the Lord, who has bought us with his blood. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholic and ecclesiastical exposition uppon the epistle of S. Iude. The Apostle: Collected and Gathered out of the workes of the best writers by Augustine Marlorat, that most notable and excellent Divine, (At London by Gerard Dewes, and Henry Marshe, 1584), fols 9-11. [Some spelling modernized.]

The Many:

1) Marlorate on the “the many” of Mattew 20:28:

{For many}

The Greek word does some what differ from the Latin. The Latin text has, “for many”: the Greek text, “for the multitude.” C [Calvin] But Christ here puts, many, not definitely for any certain number, but for a great number: because he opposes or sets himself against many. And in this sense the Apostle Paul takes it when he says: “For through the sin of the one, many be dead: much more plenteous upon many was the grace of God, and gift by grace: which was of one man Jesus Christ. In the which place Paul speaks not of any certain number of men, but comprehends all mankind. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approued Deuines (which the Lorde hath geuen to his Churche) by Augustine Marlorate. And translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Thomas Tymme, Minister, Sene and allowed according to the order appointed (Imprinted at London in Fletestreate near vnto S. Dunstones churche, by Thomas Marshe, 1570), Matt. 20:28; p., 453. [Some spelling modernized.]

2) Marlorate on “the many” in Matthew 26:28:

{That is shed for many} Luke declares that he said also, ‘For you, Christ does here do pain and set forth himself as though he were hanging on the Cross, and imbued with blood.” For he says which is shed, and not, which was shed. And when he says, “For you,” in Luke, he declares his own innocence, which was not subject to death, for so much as the Prince of this world, (which had rule over death) had nothing in him, because he was free from sin [Hebrews ?, John 14.], whereupon it was not needful that he should offer for his own sins first, according to the manner of the bye priests: because he is holy, undefiled, & void of all sin [Heb. 7.]. He teaches also how great his love towards us, that when he ought nothing unto death, he would suffer the same for us, that a man bestow his life for his friends [John 15.]. But where this our Evangelist Matthew says, that Christ said: (“For many”) some man might marvel [Objection.], seeing the Apostle says: “Christ died for all, that they which live, should not live unto themselves,” [2 Cor, 5.]. And seeing it is said in another place that Christ is the propitiation for the sins of the whole world [1 John. 2.]. The answer to this doubt is: [Answer.] That our savior Christ under the name of many, does mean not only a part of the world, but all mankind also. For he opposes or sets many against one: as if he should say that he is the redeemer not of one man only, but that he suffered death to deliver many from the guilt of sin, and curse. Even so in the fifth to the Romans, S. Paul takes many for all men, by a comparison between one and many [Rom. 5.]. Neither is there any doubt, but that Christ speaking here to a few, meant to make the doctrine common to more. Notwithstanding we must also not that in Luke, he speaking to his Disciples by name, exhorts all the faithful, to apply the effusion of his blood to their use. Therefore, when we come to the Holy Table, let not only this general cogitation come into our mind, that the world is redeemed by the blood of Christ, but also let every man think with himself that Christ has satisfied for his sins: M. [Lasix online pharmacy in Cleveland] For the death of Christ is a universal redemption: for that cause he is called the savior of the world: and the preaching of the Gospel was sent into the whole world, that all men might be called to the faith of Christ. But because the elect only do receive this grace, he is specially said to be the savior of the elect and faithful: who in comparison of the reprobate are few, & yet in themselves are many. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approued Deuines (which the Lorde hath geuen to his Churche) by Augustine Marlorate. And translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Thomas Tymme, Minister, Sene and allowed according to the order appointed (Imprinted at London in Fletestreate near vnto S. Dunstones churche, by Thomas Marshe, 1570), 643-644. [Some spelling modernized.] [Compare Luther on “the many,” and Over the counter viagra on the same.]

Universal Reconciliation:

1) A. [Marlorate] Therefore Christ refers Peter here, to the Decree and Will of his Father: even as in John also, when he says: ‘Will thou not that i shall drink of the Cup which my Father has given me?” C. [Calvin] The which words do teach that it became Christ to be dumb, and not to open his mouth, that he might be brough as a Lamb to the Sacrifice. Notwithstanding this pertains to the example, because the like sufferance is required of us all.

The Scripture compares afflictions, to Drinks. For even as the goodman of the house distributes meat, and drink to his Sons and servants: even so does God deal with us, using us as it seems good unto himself. But whether he make us merry by prosperity, or humble us by adversity, he is said to serve unto us either sweet, or sour Drink, that he might suffer the death of Christ for the reconciliation of the whole world. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiasticall exposition of the holy Gospel after S. Iohn, trans., Thomas Timme (Imprinted at London by Thomas Marshe, Anno Domini. 1575), Matt 26:53. p.,667. [Some spelling modernized.]

Christ died for all (citing 2 Cor 5:15):

1) M. [Musculus] Let them therefore see which at this day boast and glory in the title of the church, bring indeed enemies of the Church, what head they have and of whose congregation they are members. The wolf loves the sheepfolds but not as a sheep, not as a pastor, but as a wolf. We must also note this, that Christ said not to Peter, “I will build thy Church, but my Church”: that we may know the church belongs to Christ, and not to peter. For Peter is not the Lord of the Church, but Christ. Christ says that his sheep are everywhere. And the Apostles call those that are Christians the flock of the Lord, not their own flock: they acknowledge themselves to be my ministers, and not Lords. Hereupon the Apostle exhorts the bishops to reign over their flock, not as lords, but as givers of good ensample to their flocks.

The church therefore belongs to Christ & not unto every one man. It is given to him of the Father, of whom as a son he has received all things with full power. And then, beyond the right of the first begotten, he redeemed his Church or inheritance, with a great price, even with his own precious blood. And in another place it is said, “Ye are bought with a great price, be not therefore the servants of men.” Also in another place, Christ died for all men, that they which live might not live unto themselves, but unto which died for them. And again, No man lives to himself, and no man dies unto himself, for whether we live or died & rose again, that he might be both Lord both of the quick and the dead. They greatly err therefore which seek for rule in the flock and congregation of the Lord: and also which refusing to submit themselves to the power and dominion of Christ, lay their heads under the feet of men. Augustine Marlorate, A Catholike and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after S. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approued Deuines (which the Lorde hath geuen to his Churche) by Augustine Marlorate. And translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Thomas Tymme, Minister, Sene and allowed according to the order appointed (Imprinted at London in Fletestreate near vnto S. Dunstones churche, by Thomas Marshe, 1570), Matt. 13:15; p., 361. [Some spelling modernized.] [On the use of 1 Cor 5:15 cf., Vermigli’s use of this verse, as well as Augustine on the same.]

Spurgeon on Marlorate:

MARLORATUS [MARLORAT] (AUGUSTINE. 1560—1562). Exposition. Translated by Thomas Tymme. Folio. Lond., 1570-Marlorate was an eminent French reformer, preacher, and martyr. His commentaries contain the cream of the older writers, and are in much esteem, but are very rare. He wrote on the whole New Testament, but we have in English only the Gospels and Jude. Spurgeon, Commenting on Commentaries, 157. [Note: we also have his commentaries on 2 and 3 John and Revelation in English.]

This entry was posted on Monday, October 27th, 2008 at 8:50 am and is filed under For Whom did Christ Die?. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

3 comments so far

Marty
 1 

Cool!

October 27th, 2008 at 9:38 am
CalvinandCalvinism
 2 

Hey Marty,

The first one is a great comment. He clearly is quoting Calvin, but adds other helper phrases that make it categorically undeniable; like “all mankind,” “all men,” and by citing Musculus to the same point in this context. I think that’s a quote from his Common Place, but I could be wrong. As I read through his expositions I will add more comments. Keep an eye on the comments box for the next few months.

Thanks
David

October 27th, 2008 at 11:06 am
CalvinandCalvinism
 3 

The Marlorate file is continuing to expand. I have completely reorganized it and updated it. This is definitely a “to be continued” file.

David

November 19th, 2008 at 10:31 am

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